Saturday, March 11, 2017

590 MIGHTY MEMORY #272

WARM ADS CONTINUE 

WARM Radio also included schedule ads in most local newspapers. Our contributor Joe Klapatch found this one in the Scranton papers.This was dated August 24th, 1952. 
This was back in the day when radio stations had listings and ads in newspaper to help move listeners to their frequencies. 
 

590 MIGHTY MEMORY #273

WARM KEEPS ADVERTISING PUSH ON

As WARM moved to its new frequency, the station still kept up its advertising. In this ad from August 19th of 1952 the Art Bolin Swing program is highlighted. Thanks to our good friend and contributor Joe Klapatch for these ads. 
 

590 MIGHTY MEMORY #274

AUGUST 18th 1952 

WARM DEBUTS ON 590 FREQUENCY 

WARM Radio debuted on the 590 frequency on August 18th, 1952. Our contributor Joe Klapatch provided the ad that ran in The Scrantonian. The ad is in two parts. 


590 MIGHTY MEMORY #275

WARM ANNOUNCES BIG MOVE 

WARM Radio made the bight move on the dial in 1952. The station moved its frequency from 1400 to 590 with 5,000 watts of power. Here is the ad that was in the August 17th, 1952 edition of The Scrantronian. Our contributor Joe Klapatch tells us this ad appeared the day before WARM debuted on 590. 
 

590 MIGHTY MEMORY #276

WARM BROADCASTS SOAP BOX DERBY!!!!
WARM Radio was front and center in that 1950s racing craze of Soap Box vehicles. Contributor Joe Klapatch found this article from July 13th in The Scrantonian. It was WARM's foray into coverage of local sports and events. A mission they would continue well into the 21st century. 
 

590 MIGHTY MEMORY #277

WARM MAKES APPLICATION FOR TV OUTLET 

Our good friend and 590 Forever contributor Joe Klapatch has sent us this article dated July 2nd from the Scranton Times on WARM TV.  WGBI Radio also applied for a license.
 

590 MIGHTY MEMORY #278

WARM MUSIC OF MARCH 

This survey sheet features a virtual banquet of pop songs from the year 1967. There was hard stuff, fluff, pop and teen music. But topping the charts this week was a group from Cincinnati called The Casinos. 


The Casinos were a nine-member doo-wop group from Cincinnati, Ohio, led by Gene Hughes and which included Bob Armstrong, Ray White and Pete Bolton. Ken Brady performed with the group, taking over for Hughes from 1962-65 as lead singer. Pete Bolton was replaced at the time by Jerry Baker. Brady left the group to perform as a solo artist and Hughes returned, at which time The Casinos became a nine-piece group. 
They are best known for their John D. Loudermilk-penned song "Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye," which hit #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1967, well after the end of the doo-wop era.

The Casinos were playing in a Cincinnati club where WSAI disc jockey Tom Dooley liked to visit. Dooley had a song he wanted to record but needed a band to provide the music. The Casinos had been getting great reaction to "Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye" at the club and wanted to record it. Dooley offered to pay for studio time at Cincinnati's King Records Studio for the group to record their song if they would back up Dooley on his song. The Casinos' tune, not his, quickly became a national hit. (wikipedia)